How to Use the Whisper Closing Technique

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The close is one of the most crucial and important steps in the sales process. I have said it before – this really is where the rubber hits the road and where you either secure the business, or lose the sale. It’s important to have a good working knowledge of different closing techniques that you can employ for any situation that you may be in.

In one of my most popular articles, we reviewed the 1-2-3 Closing Technique, which is one of my favorites because of how simple it is. I’m a big fan of simplicity in sales. Having a close that’s really complicated will be less powerful and less successful than one that is simple and easy to do.

That’s why I am also a fan of the Whisper Closing Technique. It’s easy to understand, simple to memorize, and powerful once used.

The Definition of the Whisper Technique

The Whisper Technique can be defined as speaking in lower and softer tones of voice when presenting your product to a prospect. The idea here is to present a couple different options to the prospect first, then whisper or softly present an alternative option, which they will hopefully choose.

Other salespeople and sales teachers might use a different name for it, but I like to call it the Whisper Technique because just like the technique, it’s easy to memorize.

The Psychology Behind Softly Presenting an Alternative

First of all, the Whisper Technique heavily borrows from the Choice-Close Technique in terms of the psychology. When you present a couple different options to the prospect, you are essentially making them choose between what you presented. Unless you presented that not purchasing anything would be an option, they have a stronger chance of selecting one of your options to purchase.

Think about it: if you present two choices to a prospect (let’s use an example of vanilla or chocolate ice cream), they can either make a decision between the two, or decide not to have ice cream at all. However, not choosing to have any ice cream is out of the framework in which you presented the option, so psychologically speaking, you are guiding them down the path of selecting a flavor.

The whisper technique is basically the same thing, with a third alternative thrown in the mix at the end which is either a better deal, or more attractive. The third option is either whispered or softly spoken because it implies that the prospect is getting an “insiders deal” or a “great tip” from the salesperson that nobody else should know about.

People hate spending money, but they love saving it. The Whisper Technique is a subtle way to demonstrate value and savings to the prospect.

How to Use This Effectively

Let’s go back to the ice cream example. An example of the Whisper Technique would look something like this:

“Now, here, we have a scoop of vanilla ice cream for $2. We also have a scoop of chocolate for $4.”

*leans in and whispers/softly speaks*

“But hey, just between you and me, we had a surplus of strawberry delivered to us. I can sell you a scoop for only $3.”

What we did here was initially present the low-cost vanilla option, then the premium priced chocolate. We then leaned in and gave the “insider’s tip” that there was a surplus of strawberry and that it’s discounted at $3. It’s less expensive than the option before, so it communicates to the prospect that you are trying to actually help them, rather than just get the biggest sale that you can.

It’s more expensive than the vanilla option, but since this is an secret deal, the prospect has a strong chance of forgetting about the vanilla option and going straight to the strawberry.

Why You Should Use This

This technique is powerful. When used effectively, it greatly increases the chance that someone will make a purchase. While you might not sell the most expensive option, you increase the chance of selling a product/service that is more expensive than the lowest-priced option.

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Author: Jason Karaman

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